Author Archives: nlpnowcom

My Computer Oh Poo Poo

Published by:

No matter where I go in the world, things happen. Sometimes good, sometimes bad.

Monday night after finishing the English NLP class with NLPGrup, I returned to the apartment in Taxim Tunel, and after a while at 8:30pm, I felt hungry, and decided to get my usual wrap from La Cantine. Plus I needed milk and some Cornflakes, for my breakfast.

On returning, climbing those steep stairs, I had nothing to, as others were out enjoying themselves, perhaps drinking, relaxing, maybe deciding to stay with friends overnight, leaving pets and their family to fend for themselves. I decided to watch the SlingBox TV system. (clink to find out more)

As I watched, I wanted a cup of tea, unusual me late at night, and I had one tea back left. I sat back and enjoyed a hot cup of tea, British style, with milk.

With half my cup of tea left in my hand, the handle, a metal handle collapsed, and the remaining cup fell to the table, and my computer, some of the liquid finding its’ way onto my computer keyboard.

Handle off mug

My heart beat at double the rate, I could feel it. My reaction was to say words not allowed on the internet, I had a vision of sick deer.

What do I do.

I had to keep calm, so Oh Poo Poo, came to mind.

So what could I do?

Nothing, it had happened I had to be calm to deal with the situation, my Oh Poo Poo helped me to quickly clean-up the mess, but my new computer. The keyboard was not working.

I went to bed, with my attention on Mustapha so that I would sleep, a hard day was to Tuesday, there was not point in crying over split milk, my computer keyboard was dead. I hope my insurance will cover the damage.

The next day, I cleaned more of those internal parts I could access, I do not wish to break and seals on the computer, these could invalidate the warranty or insurance policy.

I got most of the keys working, but not all.

Oh Poo Poo.

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk

Published by:

NLPNOW

As the Turkish people are so passionate about Ataturk, I have made a little research on his history. I am sure I have not covered everything, please excuse me if I have made any mistakes, assumptions, missed anything out. Please add notes to this entry to correct my ignorance, and educate me on the history.

Ataturk

In 1881 Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was born. In 1893 he enters Military Secondary School at Salonika, and over the next years he progresses through various military schools ending-up in 1905 graduating from the General Staff College with the rank of Staff Captain and is posted to the Fifth Army, based in Damascus.

In 1906 he helps to found Fatherland (Vatan) Society in Damascus. There was trouble in the country a Counter-revolution in Istanbul, and in 1909 Ataturk as divisional chief of staff, marches with Union and Progress striking force on the city from Salonika.  By 1911 he has been promoted to Major, and he serves with the Ottoman Empire army against Montenegro, Serbia, Bulgaria and Greece. During this time many treaties were made, and it seemed broken, which resulted in Russia, Britain and France declaring war against the Ottoman Empire, in 1914.

Thoughout this campaign the Allies lost many battles, the Dardanelles, the Turkish Straits, Canakkale, the Gallipoli Peninsula, Bitlis and Muş, etc, and the Ottoman Empire lost battles and campaigns to, being forced out of Palestine and Syria, resulting on 30 October 1918, an Armistice being signed between Ottomans and Britain at Mudros. Ataturk had risen to the Rank of Commander.

Between then and 1923, many battles were fought, lost and won, especially against the Greeks in Izmir and Inonu, Sakarya, and many treaties where made, with Ataturk being given the title of “Gazi”and rank of Marshal by Grand National Assembly.

On the 24th July 1923, the  Treaty of Lausanne was signed in Switzerland by Turkey and the Entente powers that fought in World War I. After the conclusion of the Turkish War of Independence, this treaty recognized the Republic of Turkey as a sovereign nation.

On 9th October, Ankara becomes capital of Turkey. Then on the 29th October, the Proclamation of the Turkish Republic was made, with Ataturk as President. This resulted in the Ottoman dynasty being exiled.

Various radical changes were made, including the closing of religious schools, and organized Islam becoming regulated by the state, the abolition of religious courts, the abolition of fez, suppression of religious brotherhoods, and the closing of sacred tombs as places of worship, and the introduction of the Latin alphabet.

Ataturk died in 1938, having change a nation into Turkey as we know it today.

His picture, his statues, his images are every where.

The people still look up to him. 

I am 95

Published by:

I am 95 years old.

Yes, that is what age I am.

I love the Turkish people, they are kind, considerate, passionate about their culture, and their state founder Ataturk. I have done a little research on Ataturk which I have added to this blog as Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, please add and correct any mistakes I have made.

It seems that the Turkish people love to know each others ages.

In my courses I get people to introduce each other, and they will say:-

This is Murat, he is a teacher, and he is 45 years old.”

Why? I as a foriegner find this very strange, but that is one reason I love travelling to different culture, we are all the same, but different.

So, I am asked my age. It is not in British culture, well not mine, and, well, I do not want to look and feel my age. Deep down I feel 18 years old, OK, 21, after my heart proceedure.

Last week on the 13th of March was my birthday, and the NLPGRup staff gave me a chocolate cake, so now I am 95 years old.

Next year I will be 94,

English Sessions Day 2

Published by:

The day started off on the wrong foot. The pevious evening the door locking gear had brocken, so I was locked out until nearly midnight until a locksmith obtained entry. In the morning, the lift I had been offered the previous night, to take me from the Westen side of the Bosphorus to the Eastern side acroos the wonderful southern bridge, did not turn up. I had to race to get the ferry.

Arriving 5 minutes late, I suppose one could call the turnout of participants a normal Sunday. Two people were waiting for me. Plus the car that was to pick me up had already beaten me to the school.

We looked at how humans learn, that it was an experiment with a group of cats in Califonia, USA, that led to the discovery of the plasticity of the brain.

We understood that relaxation changes the way the brain can learn, and why sleep is important to each of us.

How can we relax? Just listen to my voice, or buy the CD “The Castle” buy it online, buy clicking here.

RELAX

And listen to the words as you drift.

Not Again

Published by:

The evening did not start well.

I walked down to the ferry terminal after a long day of training and having to cross the Bosphorus from Kadikoy to Beşitaş (Asian to European side of Istanbul), and saw the ferry at the quayside. I raced to the gate only to see it closing majestically with me on the wrong side, and I watched as the ferry glide out of the port.

Once back in Taxim Tunel, I brought a wrap from a little corner café, La Cantine, (now closed), run by a French couple, plus a freshly squeezed orange juice. I was to have a relaxing time, watching British TV on the computer internet through Slingbox.

Slingbox is a great device that plugs into the back of say a satellite or cable TV box, that is then connected to the inter net router at home. Through the inter net connection in whatever country I am in, I can access the Slingbox back home and watch British TV, not only that, I can control the channels I want to watch.

The apartment I am staying in is on the forth floor, with a spiral staircase. Now I am used to running up stairs, but these seem so steep, everyone that climbs those stairs, has to rest half way up. They are a killer.

Spiral Stairs, Tunel Flat, Istanbul

Spiral Stairs, Tunel Flat, Istanbul

I got to the door, gently holding my orange juice, my mouth watering at the prospect of eating my wrap. But the key would not turn.

Not three months earlier, I had returned back to the apartment to notice on the tough climb of the stairs, that there were pieces of metal laying by each flat door. I knew something was wrong.

On reaching my door, there was no point in trying to turn the key to open the door, there was no locking mechanism there, and the door was firmly shut and locked.

There was no-one in the whole building, I do not speak any Turkish. Oh Poo Poo. I called an ex employee who came to my aid, plus my translator Asu. We called a locksmith plus the police, only to find that yes we had been burgled. I had lost money, a camera.

Asuman Yildirim

Although I did not enjoy the experience, who would? I found the police here in Istanbul perhaps one of the most friendly I have encountered, even though we had to communicate via a translator.

The horror of that experience returned as I tried in vain to turn the key.

But I had Mustapha. I had the previous experience to draw upon. I called the same locksmith.

On his last visit he made sure that no-one would be able to break-in again. He was good, so good, that he took from 8:30 until 11:30pm to get in. That will teach him. Perfectionist. (Ho Ho). He had to used brute force.

Once in, it was realised that no-one had entered, it was the failure of the door locking gear. New door I think.

So by mid night I was in bed, knowing that 8am the next morning I would be picked up by car to get to the Eastern side to take the English language participants further along the process I do for easy learning.

8:10 am I get a phone call, asking if the car had arrived, as the person calling the General Manager of NLPGrup, Selva, could not reach the driver, his phone was off.

Only thing for it was to quickly catch the Tunel train and the ferry.

Walking down to the ferry terminal I passed under a bridge that crosses the water of the Golden Horn, and was amazed at the number of people standing on either side of the bridge fishing. There was not any spaces left. I would not like to sail a boat under that bridge. Looking around the Golden Horn, it seemed that the whole population of Istanbul had taken-up fishing.

Golden Horn Bridge, Istanbul

Golden Horn Bridge

There must be some great memory skills in Turkey.

As we sailed across the Bosphorus I sat in the cold morning air on the outside deck, the sea was awash was quite a swell, and as we entered each trough, the ferry created a spray of salt sea water, refreshing my face, my mind.

As we moored the other side, I noticed how clam the water became, and realised that was the state I was in. Very calm, whilst all about me was in turmoil.

We need to learn this art.

English Evening Session Day 1

Published by:

Working with the participants of NLPGrup in Istanbul, Turkey, on a new course, especially the English language courses is a joy, because they are fresh meat. Most have an open mind and want to learn.

Having worked with the man with the largest memory, Gianni Golfera, learnt Accelerated Learning techniques with Lex McKee and the Buzan Organization, it has become apparent that to learn quickly and well the human brain needs to be in a relax state.

We talked about meeting an acquaintance in the street, and the more you search for their name, the more their name disappears, and it is only when drinking a hot chocolate in your favorite coffee shop, will the name pop up, when relaxed.

The hypnotic trance was practiced with the whole group over a twenty minute period. No-one met Peter Pan or visited Never Never Land.

Lunchtime Session Day 1

Published by:

I thought I would have nothing to do between the first session of the English course and my lunchtime session.
 
It came as a surprise having been dragged from the desk I was sitting at all morning acting as head receptionist, to be sitting in a restaurant not far from the office/school, to be told it was 1:30pm. My next module would be at 1:30pm. No food had arrived yet.

The restaurant, Esinti Kanat Evi, an old wooden building of character, overlooking a large carpark, offered comfortable soft seating, and pleasant waiters, but as regards the menu, I have no idea, as the order was given and taken in Turkish, all I could say was pilic or chicken. As every thing in the world tastes of chicken, I am on good ground, I know the taste at least.

Chicken wings arrived presented on a sliced/quartered French bread roll, and very tasty too. No time for cay or tea.

People reading this, may think they can copy my work, but be careful, I am a Certified Trainer of the Society of NLP, I am a member of the NGH (National Guild of Hypnotists), many years of experience under my belt, I may have set traps for you, and certainly will not give away all my tricks.

Racing back to the awaiting participants, I knew what was coming next, what I would teach them.

I need to know that they can control their state, to get into state at will, when required. Mustapha.

Mustapha is one of the strongest tools I teach to all, be that person a police chief, the most senior Air force Office, a businessman, doctor, student, anyone, and certainly the first thing taught.

Fun was had by all, as they learned from me.

How many times? Three.

We learnt about “Oh Poo Poo“. I am on a mission, to spread around the world this saying. When used, this simple statement can make a big difference to our world.

Of course, all I teach needs practice, so perhaps a shower every day, now, let the afternoon be spent in relaxation 

Saturday morning blues

Published by:

Last night was my last night of freedom in Istanbul, because Saturday morning I start the English course off with introductions and the formalities of attending the course.

So a walk up to Taxim Square. Mixing with the Friday night people, going out for a meal, a drink, just to be with friends.

Saturday morning, did not start well, with no water to the apartment, so no shower. The normal ferry I catch was not there, times of departure must change on a Saturday. I am ten minutes late for the course, and there is no translator. Get on with it, get the course started. I failed in my own standards, to be at the course at least half an hour before the start.

Although I was not a member of the Scouts, I wore long trousers not silly shorts, as I was in the Boys Brigade, I stand by their moto, Be Prepared. The Boys Brigade was “Sure and Steadfast”.

Ok, put a smile on my face, get in there and start the course, the participants are paying the bills and they expect the goods.

NLP, PhotoReading, Mind Maps, Hypnosis, Memory, Coaching and Learning English

Published by:

NLPNOW for training

My day was taken up by planning course for the future year here in Turkey, so that there will be no clashes with courses in other countries, such as Sri Lanka, India, Italy, UK etc.

Over the last number of years I have been traveling regularly to Turkey amongst other countries to give training to companies, individuals and to public classes in NLP, Hypnosis, Mind Maps, PhotoReading, Memory Techniques, Coaching etc. and enjoying every moment. Why did I waste 35 years working in the computer industry?

It was said once that I could not be good because I do so much. Well I made a strategic decision to go to the founders of any technologies the originators, to learn from them, and get their aurthortity to teach their work.

For a number of years I was an assistant on Richard Bandler’s courses, I watched I learned from the co-founder of NLP, and got his approval as a trainer of the Society of NLP, I worked and learned hypnosis from Paul McKenna and the Dean of Stage Hypnosis, Ormond McGill, I went to Paul Schelle to learn PhotoReading, I went to Tony Buzan to learn Mind Maps, Dr Win Wenger of Image Streaming, Joe McMoneagle of the Stargate project, the man with the biggest memory Gianni Golfera. I have not learned from someone who learns from someone else who learns from someone else. And, I certainly have not plagiarized others work and called it my own by changing a few words but keeping the content and structure exactly the same.

So the question was put, why should our clients come to NLPGrup, why should they get a certificate or license.

I put it to the sales team that perhaps it is like going to buy a car.

You have two outlets next to each other one with the sign Toyota and the other Toy Ota.

The first outlet has brand new cars with warranty, straight from the factory, shinning paintwork, all the extras.

When you look in at the second outlet, you see there is a sign on the from of the car that looks like Toyota, but when you look at the wheels they are from a babies pram, the bodywork is made from a cardboard box that once held a refrigerator, the seats are cushions, and there is no engine but a hole in the floor where your legs fit to propel you along the road.

With NLPGrup they are getting the real Toyota.

The English courses are extremely interesting. A friend and my translator in Italy, Elena Martelli, teaches Italian in Bologna to mature foreign students, when not in class they stay with Italian families, and become totally immersed in the language. Total immersion is the best way to learn a language not two hours a week, I know I have tried and failed.

We have the students 12 hours a day for 9 days, 9am till 9pm, and I sometimes have them for three sessions, 9am, 1:30 pm and 6:30pm, to teach them accelerated learning techniques, relaxation and some NLP.

It is a joy to see and hear the change made in the participants language, although they may not notice themselves.

Perhaps I need the magic switch I use on my Stage Hypnosis to get them to speak Martian.

Have a good day.

Friday, my last day of rest, Ho Ho

Published by:

Yesterday, I had another lay-in, and then took the ferry to Kadikoy to the office/school to arrange the training courses for the rest of the year here in Turkey, and to have lunch in a small family run restaurant/café.

On my journey, I was able to watch people going about their day, some were in a hurry to get to meetings, some had nothing to do, some were tourists being overwhelmed by new sights and sounds.

La Cantine and Tunel Tram

La Cantine and Tunel Tram

They looked at the old tram which rumbles up and down Taxim Hill between Taxim Square and Tunel. A real old machines, lovingly maintained, which makes them a joy to ride.

Beside the tram stop a vendor sells the traditional Simit, a round ring of bread with I presume sesame seeds, the Turkish people love them, as there are vendors on every street corner, or you hear them shouting out for people to buy them as they balance a tray of the on their head, or you see them walking between the cars of the ever increasing traffic jams with simit’s strung on broom handles.

On my journey on the ferry to the Eastern side, I sat in the open stern, cold but enjoying the views of Istanbul. I look back to where we had just departed, as a young woman  threw pieces of Simit into the air for the hungry seagulls to pluck midair, to the masses of apartments perched on the step hills of Istanbul.

There, I say the Galata Tower. From 1348 this tower has dominated the skyline of Istanbul, originally known as the Tower of Christ, it was a lookout tower of the Genoese colony called Galata. this 12-storey construction once functioned as a jail for prisoners of war, a shipyard, a warehouse and a fire station. Today the Galata Tower is one of Istanbul’s major attractions, offering fantastic views of the city and its landmarks. It is said that, an Ottoman citizen, Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi was the first person to fly, launched himself from the tower and crossed the Bosphorus.

Galata Tower from the Bosphorus

Galata Tower from the Bosphorus

Gatalta Tower from the ferry, with seagulls      Gallata Tower or the Tower of Christ

Again as we crossed to the other side, I saw the trade of the world happening as ships moored at the quayside to unload their cargo, and take new containers of goods to the rest of the world.

The container port of Istanbul

Tugs pushed the massive vessels into the quayside as they tied up, large cranes towered over containers stacked high on the decks. I wonder what is inside each container?

I was cold but enjoyed being alive, seeing life as it happens.